Money

These 7 Major Companies Will Help Pay For Your College Degree

Why not let your boss pick up the tab for school?

Balancing school and work is one of the toughest challenges for many students. It’s hard to choose between finishing papers at the library and punching a time card for a few extra hours—especially when only one of those is going to help you pay rent in the short term. Plus, your boss probably doesn’t want to hear that a project was late because you had to finish your homework.

Luckily, though, not all bosses are against your educational dreams. In fact, there are a number of companies that will not only encourage you to go back to school, but are actually willing to help pay for your college degree.

These are just a few of the major companies that offer financial support for their employees’ education:

1. Starbucks

Not content just to hire veterans and refugees, Starbucks is also committed to supporting students. The caffeine giant has offered full tuition coverage for employees’ bachelors’ degrees since 2014. The Starbucks College Achievement Plan (SCAP), in partnership with Arizona State University, offers tuition reimbursement for eligible full- and part-time employees pursuing their first bachelor’s degree who work at least 20 hours per week.

The plan is available for the full four years of study, and doesn’t even require baristas to stay at Starbucks after graduation. It’s also open to spouses or children of employees who are members of the military or veterans.

starbucks photo
Getty Images | Christopher Furlong

2. Verizon

Verizon’s Tuition Assistance Program offers up to $8,000 a year in tuition assistance for eligible employees. The program’s description stipulates that the employees should be working on a degree or certificate to “help further their career with Verizon” in order to qualify. It isn’t totally clear what that means, but probably applies to courses related to information management, communications technology or business.

verizon photo
Getty Images | Spencer Platt

3. UPS

Since 1999, UPS has distributed a whopping $187 million to 113,000 students through its tuition assistance program. UPS offers tuition assistance to full-time, non-union employees, part-time union employees and part-time management employees. It also provides 100 percent reimbursement for non-union managers who participate in an online undergraduate program offered through Thomas Edison College.

ups photo
Getty Images | Kevork Djansezian

4. Intel

Intel’s tuition assistance program covers up to 100 percent of reimbursable costs—including tuition, books and even some fees—for employees enrolled in work-related courses. This is in addition to the extensive in-house training available through Intel University, an internal program that offers more than 7,000 different courses to help employees reach their career goals.

intel photo
Getty Images | Justin Sullivan

5. BP

BP’s Educational Assistance Program supports workers pursuing education that “benefits both the employee and the Company.” The program offers up to 90 percent reimbursement for tuition, books and other approved fees from an accredited institution.

Full-time employees become eligible for this program as soon as they’re hired, but need to get official approval before registering. Students must also pass all their courses to stay eligible for reimbursement.

bp photo
Getty Images | Oli Scarff

6. Procter & Gamble

The consumer goods giant helps employees reach their learning goals with a generous tuition reimbursement program. P&G offers 80 percent reimbursement of pre-approved tuition and qualified fees, up to a lifetime total of $40,000. The courses or programs should be related to employees’ current job or potential future positions at the company.

procter products photo
Getty Images | Mike Simons

7. Chevron

Chevron’s Career Development Support program covers up to 75 percent of costs for tuition, books and fees for approved courses. Like the P&G program, employees need to be enrolled in a program that relates to their current role or plans for a future position at the company.

chevron photo
Getty Images | Justin Sullivan

[h/t: The Krazy Coupon Lady]