Bakery Got Backlash For Pride Cookies, But Then Supportive Patrons Bought Out Their Entire Inventory

When Dawn Cooley and Miranda Dolder shared a post on Facebook about Pride Month, they never expected the backlash — or the subsequent support — that would follow. The owners of Confections Bakery in Lufkin, Texas, posted a photo of heart-shaped cookies decorated in vibrant rainbow colors. Their intention was to simply spread some love and cheer as Pride Month kicked off.

“More LOVE. Less hate,” they wrote in the post on June 2. “Happy Pride to all our LGBTQ friends! All lovers of cookies and happiness are welcome here.”

Just look at these beautiful rainbow-colored heart-shaped cookies in their Facebook post:

The following day, the sisters, who have owned the Texas bakery for 11 years, shared some disheartening news.

“Today has been hard. Really hard,” they wrote in a Facebook post. “We lost a significant amount of followers because of a rainbow heart cookie we posted. We received a very hateful message on our business page canceling a large order (5dz) of summer themed cookies for tomorrow morning (that we just finished decorating) because of a rainbow heart cookie we posted. My heart is heavy.”

News of the canceled order spread quickly, and customers started showing up to support the bakery. On June 4, the bakery opened to sell individual cookies from the canceled order. The shop had to close early that day as they had sold out of everything. Customers lined up down the street to make purchases, as shown in this Facebook post.

“We are overwhelmed,” posted the Confections bakers. “This was taken around noon today and sent to us by a sweet customer. Thank you.”

Support for the bakery also came pouring in online from all over the U.S., with Facebook followers from every corner of the country asking the shop if they could place orders online. Followers from Canada and the U.K. chimed in with encouraging comments, too. Author Brian Cuban, brother of entrepreneur Mark Cuban, offered to purchase goodies and donate them.

“If shipping isn’t possible, I’ll buy some by phone/email and you can donate my cookies to a local LGBTQ org or children’s charity,” he commented.

Then, on June 8, Cuban updated his comment to include the charity where he ended up making a donation.

“Hey all! I donated to CASA of the Pines on behalf of Confections, a wonderful local org advocating for abused and neglected children.” Cuban included a link for sending donations to CASA of the Pines.

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Other fans began making donations in the bakery’s honor once the cookies and other treats had all been sold, and the bakers sent much of the donated money to animal shelters. Later, they encouraged anyone who felt moved to donate more money to support LGBTQ organizations.

“People who want to donate can show support by checking out local chapters of LGBTQ in (our) community and your own,” Confections wrote in an Instagram post. “Please feel free to drop your link in the comments and let’s spread the love and acceptance with a donation or a follow on their accounts!”

The bakery has since gained thousands of followers on social media, but made the bakers made it clear that they didn’t want the focus on themselves. In a Facebook post, they shared their gratitude for the outpouring of love and acceptance they received.

“We just want to make our cookies,” they wrote. “We just want people to be happy in our shop surrounded by our cookies that are made with LOVE. We want people who receive our cookies to be happy.”