Food & Recipes

$10 Container Keeps Guacamole Fresh For Days

No more brown guacamole!

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Chip-and-dip enthusiasts know this situation well: A big, beautiful batch of guacamole inevitably turns an unappetizing shade of grayish-brown, even when stored as carefully as possible.

A result of exposure to oxygen, the queasy color is basically harmless — it’s just what happens when avocado innards go outwards. Nonetheless, it doesn’t look good, and certainly doesn’t appeal to any guests surveying your snack table.

Chin up, green guacamole fans: The Prepworks by Progressive Fresh Guacamole ProKeeper gets rave reviews on Amazon — and in our home test, the high ratings seem well deserved.

Kathleen St. John

The device is simple: a sturdy, smallish bowl with an airtight lid. After piling in a batch of guac, the lid slowly smooshes down until it’s flush with the dip.

The lid burps out air as it’s pushed down, creating a firm seal against the guacamole. Air’s not getting in, so the tasty avocado flesh stays fresh and green  — in this case, for days.

To test it out, I split a batch of fresh-made guacamole between the ProKeeper and one of my beloved Snapware containers. I didn’t have high hopes, to be honest. I’ve watched my share of avocados go brown and mushy with even the most diligent storage strategies.

Here’s what the guac looked like in the ProKeeper at first:

Kathleen St. John

Here’s what it looked like the next day, compared to the guac stored in the Snapware:

Kathleen St. John

Surprise! That ProKeeper really works. There were a few spots of brown in the container, areas where an air pocket got trapped. But for the most part, the avocados stayed a vibrant green, while the hastily-stored Snapware batch lost its color within hours.

I did a taste test the following day. Sure enough, the guac tasted as fresh as when I first made it.

Kathleen St. John

If there’s one bummer about the ProKeeper, it’s that it’s not great for storing a small amount of guacamole. The half-batch I used to test the container wasn’t enough to get a good seal against the lid. Instructions included with the ProKeeper note that it’s best to create a small heap of guac so it smooshes down correctly.

So, maybe it’s not ideal for a leftover bit of guac from dinner. But if you’ve got a big batch to store — say, in advance of a gathering — this is the storage container to grab.