Nature, Weather & Space

Florida May Soon Be Getting Its First Snow Park

This winter wonderland sounds amazing! Here's what we know so far.

Florida is the Sunshine State, and warm beach days are plentiful throughout much of the year in that region of the country. One thing the Southern state doesn’t have a lot of, however, is snow.

Native Floridians who have been deprived of the white stuff their whole lives, as well as transplants from colder climates, may soon get the opportunity to experience the wintry precipitation as the state may be getting its first snow park. Point Summit Inc., the company that manages the TreeHoppers Aerial Adventure Park, is currently waiting on approval from city officials to construct the park in Dade City in Pasco County, Florida.

The park would only be open during the colder months of fall and winter. The snow would be man-made and environmentally friendly. Point Summit is looking to build the park on a 58-acre site across from the TreeHoppers location. The snow park would include a tubing run as well as space to simply play in the snow.

Adobe

Residents are divided about the prospect of a snow park in their state. Although the idea sounds interesting, some wonder about the feasibility of a winter wonderland in such a warm climate.

“I’ve been to a snow park up in North Carolina,” local resident Jacob Yundt told ABC Action News. “It was pretty cool. They made their own fake snow, but how would that do in Florida?”

Adobe

Others feel that the park would be a great addition to the area’s attractions.

“This is a great, unique asset that could attract a lot of attention to Pasco County in a great, positive light,” Adam Thomas, Pasco County’s tourism director, told ABC Action News. “We have all these great amenities that really makes Pasco unique in the sports arena. Now we’re just trying to add on to that.”

Twitter user @WuhTang agrees, tweeting: “FLORIDA SHOULD INVEST IN AN INDOOR SNOW PARK” and following it up with the praying hands emoji.

Do you think a snow park could work in Florida, or should the Sunshine State stick to what it does best?