High School Football Players Save Woman Following Car Crash

High school football players work hard every day during practice to build their physical strength and learn the value of teamwork. Sometimes, life presents an opportunity to demonstrate those skills off the playing field. Recently, six members of a Georgia high school football team received just such an opportunity when they saw a woman in danger after a car accident — and they jumped into action.

Luis Goya, a teacher at Rome High School in Rome, Georgia, stood outside the school during his ordinary morning duty when he heard a loud noise at the nearby intersection. On Facebook, Goya shared the amazing event that soon unfolded, along with photos from the scene.

“There was a 50-year-old lady trapped in her car and couldn’t get out,” Goya wrote in his Facebook post. “Smoke started to come out of the car, and fluid started to spill everywhere in the intersection. The door was jammed and in terrible shape.”

As Goya talked with 911 dispatchers, requesting help to the scene, he saw a group of students run toward the damaged car and work frantically to get the woman out.

“They literally started using their strength to pry the door open, so the lady could be released,” Goya continued in his post. “After a few seconds of pulling and pushing the door, the boys ended up opening it and helped her get out of the car.”

Not only did the students help extricate the woman from the damaged car, they also stayed with her until help arrived.

Later that day, officials from Rome High School issued a press release in which they identified the six students who helped the woman and shared a photo of the young men.

“Thank you, young men, for being examples our community can be proud of! Lead #likeawolf,” the press release praised the team members.

Shown in the photo (from left to right) are Cesar Parker, Treyvon Adams, Antwiion Carey, Messiah Daniels, Tyson Brown and Alto Moore.

Rome High School

News of the rescue spread and the students have been featured on many news outlets, including “Good Morning America,” where the TV hosts shared video surveillance of the six young men at the scene of the accident.

Despite all the accolades, the players say they simply did what had to be done.

“I knew I had to help her [in] some way,” Treyvon Adams told “GMA.” “I knew my friends would feel the same way as me.”