Money

Motorcyclist Tried To Fake An Accident—Little Did He Know A Dash Cam Was Watching

Here's what to do if you're a victim of a "staged accident" scam.

What could have been a nightmare scenario for one driver has instead become a viral video — thanks to a dashboard video camera that revealed a staged accident.

In the July 2017 video, a British woman is driving her vehicle in a residential neighborhood when a motorcyclist pulls out onto the street in front of her. The car driver slows down to allow for space between her car and the motorcyclist, who at this point is still standing alongside his bike.

What happened next was bizarre: Instead of getting on the bike and going on his way, the man purposefully backs his motorcycle into the front of the woman’s vehicle. He then throws himself onto her windshield, in an attempt to mimic a car collision. Afterwards, the motorcycle driver puts on a performance, acting injured and holding his lower back, while another man, who seems to be recording the “accident,” comes onto the scene.

The woman, of course, has a few choice words for these men. But as soon as she points out her dashboard camera and lets them know she has recorded them, the men run away.

While there is no further information about the details of the incident (and no proof of the authenticity of the video, either), you should know that car insurance scams like this are common. Criminals stage auto accidents in order to collect money by submitting bogus insurance claims.

How To Spot An Auto Insurance Scam

According to the private site DMV, while there are many different ways a scammer may stage a fake car accident, scammers often involve phony “eye witnesses” who are in on the scam.

People who own new or luxury cars or who drive a big rig or other work vehicle could be at greater risk for a scam since these vehicles might have higher insurance payouts. Auto insurance scammers may also target women or older adults as well because they think they will be easier to intimidate.

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What To Do If You Suspect You’re The Victim Of A Car Insurance Scam

If you find yourself involved in a car accident and suspect there’s something fishy about it, DMV recommends calling the police and gathering as much evidence as possible at the scene.

That means taking photos from every angle of both vehicles and their license plates. You especially want to zoom in and capture the details of the damage. Make sure to photograph the driver, as well as everyone else in the car.

In addition, you’ll want to write down pertinent information, including the other person’s name and contact information, driver’s license number, insurance information, vehicle registration information and a general physical description of each person involved.

Arming yourself with as much information as possible is the best way to fight auto insurance scams. And if you do have a dash cam, don’t make the mistake of pointing it out to the scammers like the woman in the video did.

Play it cool until you’ve collected all of their information and the police have arrived on the scene. Don’t give crooks the chance to run away and try this scam on someone else.