Health

If You Used This Acne Drug, You Might Be Eligible For Some Of A $20M Class-Action Settlement

If you know anyone who has used this prescription acne medication, be sure to pass this along.

Anyone who suffers from acne knows how challenging it can be to manage. While you can try changing your diet or use DIY solutions involving Listerine or honey, sometimes more is needed — like prescription drugs.

Over the last several years, if you used the prescription drug Solodyn to treat acne or any other skin condition, you could be eligible for a class-action lawsuit. According to a press release, three pharmaceutical companies have been accused of violating state competition (i.e. antitrust and consumer protection) by agreeing not to compete with each other and keeping lower-cost generic versions of Solodyn off the market.

perscription photo
Getty Images | Tim Boyle

The companies deny the claims, but have agreed to pay $20 million to settle the lawsuit. That means that, if eligible, you could get a share of the cash. Just how much depends on how many people file a claim, and how much they paid for the drugs.

You are only eligible to file a claim if you paid for Solodyn or a generic version between July 23, 2009 and Feb. 25, 2018. If you paid a flat copay for all your prescription drug purchases, whether brand-name or generic, you are not eligible for the settlement. You are also not eligible if you purchased the drug through a Medicaid program. Eligible doses range from 45 mg to 135 mg.

prescription bottles photo
Flickr | wellness_photos

If you believe you are eligible, you have to file your claim by July 31, 2018 either online or by calling 1-800-332-7414. You’ll be asked how much you spent on Solodyn or its generic version during the relevant time period, so having your receipts handy could help.

It’s important to note that this lawsuit has nothing to do with the product itself. As noted in the release, there are no claims that Solodyn is unsafe or ineffective.

Have you or someone you know used Solodyn or any generic versions of the drug?