Disease & Illness

Nearly 100,000 Pounds Of Ground Beef Recalled For Potential E. Coli

Here's what you need to know.

It’s a host’s worst nightmare: getting everyone sick with food poisoning. With one of the biggest eating days of the year around the corner, you can never be too careful when it comes to food safety.

On Nov. 19, Utah-based Swift Beef Co. recalled 99,260 pounds of raw ground beef products due to possible E. coli contamination, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Additionally, around 530 pounds of raw beef products from Salt Lake City-based Majestic Meat Company were also recalled, according to a news release.

Both company’s beef samples tested positive for the bacteria, which is known to cause bloody diarrhea, fever, nausea and vomiting. Later symptoms include excessive bleeding, nosebleeds, seizures and shortness of breath.

Recalled Majestic Meat Company products include ground beef patties, bulk ground beef,  and 10-pound packages of beef, pork and veal meatballs delivered to restaurants in Utah. These recalled products have the establishment number “EST. 19915” on them.

Here are the exact details of the recalled Majestic Meat Company meat:

  • 10 lb. plastic packages “MAJESTIC MEAT” 2/1(patties per pound) Ground Beef Patties 80/20 with a production date of 11/8/2018
  • 10 lb. plastic packages “MAJESTIC MEAT” 8/1 (patties per pound) Ground Beef Patties 80/20 with a production date of 11/8/2018
  • 10 lb. plastic packages “MAJESTIC MEAT” 3/1 (patties per pound) Ground Beef Patties 80/20 with a production date of 11/8/2018
  • 5 lb. plastic packages “MAJESTIC MEAT” 4/1 (patties per pound) Ground Beef Patties 80/20 with a production date of 11/8/2018
  • 10 lb. plastic packages “MAJESTIC MEAT” bulk Ground Beef 80/20 with a production date of 11/8/2018
  • 10 lb. plastic packages “44 FARMS” 5/1 (patties per pound) Ground Beef Patties 80/20 with a production date of 11/8/2018
  • 10 lb. plastic packages “44 FARMS” 3/1 (patties per pound) Ground Beef Patties 80/20 with a production date of 11/8/2018
  • 10 lb. plastic packages “44 FARMS” 2/1 (patties per pound) Ground Beef Patties 80/20 with a production date of 11/8/2018
  • 10 lb. plastic packages “44 FARMS” 4/1 (patties per pound) Beef Patty Chuck 80/20 with a production date of 11/8/2018
  • 10 lb. plastic packages “44 FARMS” 7 oz. Ground Beef Patties 80/20 with a production date of 11/8/2018
  • 4.05 lb. plastic shrink-wrapped packages “44 FARMS” 7 oz. Ground Beef Patties 80/20 with a production date of 11/8/2018
  • 10 lb. plastic packages “44 FARMS” 10 oz. Ground Beef Patties 80/20 with a production date of 11/8/2018
  • 10 lb. plastic packages “44 FARMS” bulk Ground Beef 80/20 with a production date of 11/8/2018
  • 10 lb. plastic packages “Meatball Beef, Pork, Veal Ground” with a production date of 11/8/2018

In addition, recalled meat from Swift Beef Co. included packages of beef and 2,000-pound bulk pallets of fine ground beef, which were sent to retail distributors for further processing and food distributors in California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington and Utah. These products will have an establishment number of “EST. 628” on them.

Here are the exact details of the recalled Swift meat:

  • 2,000 lb. – bulk pallets of Swift Ground Beef 81/19 (81% lean) fine grind combo with product code 42982.
  • 8-10 lb. – plastic wrapped chubs of “blue ribbon BEEF” Ground Beef 81/19 (81% lean) coarse grind bearing product code 42410.
  • 8-10 lb. – plastic wrapped chubs of “blue ribbon BEEF” Ground Beef 93/07 (93% lean) coarse grind bearing product code 42413.
  • 8-10 lb. – plastic wrapped chubs of “blue ribbon BEEF” Ground Beef 85/15 (85% lean) coarse grind bearing product code 42415.
  • 8-10 lb. – plastic wrapped chubs of “blue ribbon BEEF” Ground Beef 73/27 (73% lean) coarse grind bearing product code 42510.

Since both companies shipped their products to restaurants or distributors for further processing, you likely won’t find this beef in your refrigerator at home (but it doesn’t hurt to check!).

The FSIS advises that all individuals only eat ground beef that’s been cooked to a temperature of at least 165 degrees Fahrenheit. E. coli bacteria are able to live on surfaces for weeks, so its very important to wash your hands after handling meat and keeping a sterilized cooking space, according to the food safety law firm, Marler Clark.

Another important thing to note: cross contamination. Be aware of which items you cut on cutting boards, the utensils used during the cooking process and anything else that may come in contact with raw meat, such as plates, pans and other food.

If you’re worried you have come in to contact with the E. coli bacteria, head straight to your doctor, as this is the only sure-fire way to find out if you have it.