Disease & Illness

The FDA Just Expanded Its Warning Not To Eat Cut Melon Due To Salmonella To 10 More States

At least 60 people have become ill after eating cut watermelon, honeydew and cantaloupe.

Alabama, California, Florida, Kansas, Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Tennessee have been added to the list of states where cut melon may be contaminated with salmonella, the US Food and Drug Administration said Thursday. This brings the total number of states to 23.

Cut watermelon, honeydew and cantaloupe as well as fruit salads containing these melons have been recalled from stores in these states, including Walmart, Kroger, Walgreens, Sprouts Farmers Market, Costco and Whole Foods/Amazon.

The FDA has posted a full list of retailers and locations where it believes contaminated melon was sold.

cut melon photo
Flickr | cookbookman17

Consumers who have purchased cut melon from these locations should throw it away.

In addition, the agency has advised retailers not to serve or sell precut melon products distributed by Caito Foods Distribution, Gordon Food Service or SpartanNash Distribution.

honeydew photo
Flickr | Breville USA

The FDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are working with state health officials to determine the source of the contamination.

According to the CDC, at least 60 people became ill in this outbreak from April 30 to May 28. Those illnesses were reported in five Midwestern states where the outbreak was initially announced.

cantaloupe photo
Getty Images | Joe Raedle

Although the FDA has expanded the list of states warned about consumption of melon, the CDC has not updated the number of illnesses reported.

Symptoms of salmonella include diarrhea, fever and abdominal pain that begins 12 to 72 hours after exposure to the bacteria. Most people recover in four to seven days.

watermelon photo
Flickr | Aaron_M

According to the CDC, salmonella is to blame for 23,000 hospitalizations and 450 deaths every year in the United States.

Cereal Also Linked to Salmonella

Melons aren’t the only culprits causing people to get sick right now.

A salmonella outbreak that affected 73 people in 31 states has been linked to Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said June 14.

kellogg photo
Getty Images | Scott Olson

The Kellogg Company said on June 24 it was voluntarily recalling 15.3-ounce and 23-ounce packages of the cereal with a “best if used by” date from June 14, 2018, through June 14, 2019, according to a statement.

The illnesses from the outbreak started from March 3 to May 28, the CDC said. The CDC said 24 people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported, the CDC said. Most of the outbreaks occurred in California, Massachusetts, New York and Pennsylvania, the CDC said.

Based on epidemiological evidence, Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal is likely the source of the outbreak, the CDC said. The agency said 30 of the 39 people interviewed about the foods they ate in the week before they grew ill reported eating cold cereal, and 14 people specifically reported eating Kellogg’s Honey Smacks.

RELATED: A Salmonella Outbreak In 31 States Has Been Linked To Kellogg’s Honey Smacks Cereal

Those who fell ill reported eating the Honey Smacks cereal more than another cereal, the CDC said.

honey smacks kellogg photo
Flickr | torbakhopper

After the CDC and Food & Drug Administration contacted Kellogg’s about the reported illness, the company said it immediately launched an investigation with the third-party manufacturer that produces the cereal.

The UPC code for the recalled 15.3-ounce packages is 38000 39103, according to Kellogg’s and the CDC. The recalled 23-ounce packages have a UPC code of 38000 14810.

Written by Debra Goldschmidt and Darran Simon for CNN.

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