Animals

There’s A New Baby Rhino At The Buffalo Zoo And He’s Absolutely Adorable

He's so cute!

There’s a new addition to the Buffalo Zoo! Tashi, a one-horned rhino, has given birth to a male calf.

The baby rhino weighed in at 123.5 pounds. Both Tashi and her new son are doing well. For now, mom and baby will not be in the zoo’s exhibit, and will instead be kept separate so they can be monitored while the new calf adjusts to the world. His name will be announced at a later date when he makes his eventual public debut.

The Buffalo Zoo did tweet, however, about the arrival of the newest member of their family:

“OH BABY!” they wrote. “We are excited to share that after 488 days of pregnancy, Tashi our greater one-horned rhino gave birth to a 123.5-pound male calf. The Zoo animal care team report mom and baby are bonding and doing well.”

This is Tashi’s fourth calf. He was conceived through artificial insemination, and his birth makes for the third successful birth of a greater one-horned rhino conceived through this method. Prior to the birth of her fourth calf, zoo staff were busy keeping Tashi comfortable and preparing for her labor and delivery.

“Things can always go wrong with these pregnancies,” Christian Dobosiewicz, the zoo’s communications manager, told WGRZ on June 3. “We want to make sure that people do know that, but we are doing everything we can to make her comfortable.”

In April, Zoo Miami celebrated the arrival of their own one-horned baby rhino. Its birth marked the first time a rhino was born through induced ovulation and artificial insemination.

“[T]o save some of these endangered species, we need every tool we can get in our toolbox,” Terri Roth, vice president of Asia programs at the International Rhino Foundation, told WBUR. “Assisted reproduction is one of those tools.”

Check out how adorable these special animals are with this video of an 11-day-old one-horned rhino splashing in the bath at the Toronto Zoo:

How cute! We’re so glad that conservationists are working hard to make sure these animals survive.