Entertainment

This Website Helps You Find Streaming Content Based On How You’re Feeling

Finally!

We’ve all been there. You have a bad day at work or you feel down in the dumps or low-energy and all you want to do is sprawl out on the couch and binge-watch the latest Netflix series.

While you may already have a go-to show or movie that always takes your mind off your troubles, did you know there are actually specific shows, movies and videos that positively impact brain chemistry and can boost your mood?

A new website called Moodrise 1000 has pulled together 1,000 hours of content from YouTube, Netflix, Amazon Prime and Hulu and categorized them into “feelings” organized by neurotransmitters — the brain chemicals that correlate to specific mood states.

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Here’s how it works: Just head to Moodrise 1000’s website to browse content by “feeling” or by your preferred streaming service. Each piece of content is labeled with its related neurotransmitter and mood. For example, if you’re feeling anxious, you might want to click on “calm” to enhance the neurotransmitter GABA.

Other categories include confidence, connection, energy, focus and happiness. Of course, being calm can also lead to feelings of happiness, so you would probably find content to help you feel better in either category if you’re feeling stressed.

What type of content will you find? To give just one example, if you click over to the “calm” category, you’ll find healing music, a selection of nature videos on YouTube and shows like “Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown” and “The Great British Baking Show” on Netflix.

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All of the categorizations are scientifically backed, with links to supporting scientific research included on the site, so you can read more about why the content was chosen before you choose it.

All content suggestions were selected by a group of “judges” made up of actors, musicians, film producers and others, including actress Kristin Scott Thomas, who starred in “Four Weddings and a Funeral” and producer Lynn Harris, who worked on “About a Boy” and “The Notebook.”

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Will you be checking out Moodrise 1000 for your next binge-watching session? What is your go-to show or movie when you’re needing a mood boost?