Life

This Mom Gave A Lesson On Car Seat Safety With The Help Of Some Eye-Opening Photos

If you wouldn't feel safe doing this with your car seat, you're doing it wrong.

One mom posted two photos to Facebook of her baby strapped into a car seat, and it’s taken social media by storm.

With nearly 50,000 shares within the past week, Rachel McNamara posted photos of her child in a car seat, which she first held over her head and then flipped upside down.

The Facebook post was published to serve as a reminder of car seat safety. “After strapping your child into their car seat, ask yourself if you’d be comfortable flipping it upside down. Remember that the chest clip should be at armpit level and the straps should be tight enough to pass the pinch test,” McNamara wrote.

Shortly thereafter, the post started to go viral, and McNamara updated it with even more helpful tips. Though not before stating that she’s not advocating flipping kids upside down before car rides. She just thought it was a great visual. And from the popularity of the post, others thought the same thing.

In addition to her instructions about the chest clip, McNamara also added in info on the importance of the shoulder straps, and making sure they’re in the correct slots.

“Please read your car seats manual first because there are some exceptions. But with most car seats, when they are rear facing the straps should be at or below their shoulders and when they are forward facing, the straps should be at or above their shoulders,” McNamara wrote.

The pinch test is then mentioned, which is where you shouldn’t be able to pinch any part of the strap with two fingers once your child is buckled in and the chest clip is in the proper place. She writes, “If you can pinch the strap here’s what to do: move the chest clip back down, tighten the straps, move the chest clip back up and test again.”

Her other tips include making sure your car seat is installed correctly and the importance of reading not only the car seat manual, but also your car’s manual.

“There should be less than an inch of movement of the car seat at the belt/latch path. Always use the top tether when forward facing. Only uses the latch system OR the seatbelt to install your car seat. Never use both (with the exception of a few brands). Check your car seats manual. If you need help installing your car seat or have any questions about what seat would be best for your child or the best fit in your car, call your local Child Passenger Safety Technician (CPST). Remember that not all fire departments or police stations have a CPST and may not be educated about car seats. To find one, click here: http://cert.safekids.org/.”

She also shared tips on whether to keep your child rear-facing or front-facing, and voiced her concerns about after-market products, such as infant inserts and pads. Then she linked to a helpful website that shares non-regulated products for car seats to raise awareness.

McNamara is grateful her post was shared so many times and wrote,” I can’t thank everyone enough for all your positive comments and shares. I hope this post makes a difference!”

She also joked that had she known her post was going to get so much attention, she would have changed her clothes first.

RELATED: Mom Warns About Car Seat Safety After Daughter Sustains Horrifying Injury

Regardless, we think she looks great and love the tips she’s shared.