News

The Biggest Cruise Ship In The World Is Being Built

What will cruise directors think of next?

Have you ever thought about taking a vacation with 7,000 of your closest friends? In just a few years, you’ll be able to. At that time, the world’s largest cruise ship will set sail, hosting a record number of guests.

MSC Cruises recently announced their order of two mega-ships. One will debut in 2022, and the other in 2024. “MSC Cruises’ World Class cruise ships will feature 2,760 cabins and a maximum occupancy of 6,850 guests, the highest passenger capacity in the global cruise fleet,” according to a press release. And the ship will be a whopping 330 meters long. Conde Nast Traveler calculates that this is almost as long as three football fields, and that it will hold about a hundred more guests than the leading cruise ships.

The ships will, of course, be outfitted with all of the latest cruise luxuries, which their customers expect. A different MSC ship, just unveiled this summer, includes amenities like an indoor promenade, water slides, a bowling alley and even a flight simulator, according to USA Today.

According to the cruise line, the look of the new World Class ships will be different than other cruise ships you’ve boarded. “The World Class’ futuristic ‘Y’ shape structure will enable panoramic sea views and increase the proportion of balcony cabins,” they wrote.

MSC Cruises are popular in the Mediterranean, South Africa and Brazil, they say, though they also offer sailings in the Caribbean, Northern Europe and other areas. You may have heard of MSC before as the provider of a forthcoming, buzzed-about 119-day itinerary. This “World Cruise” will allow travelers to see 49 stops in 32 countries. It leaves in January 2019 and will return in May.

This ship is just the latest innovation to the cruising industry. A different cruise provider, Ponant, recently shared its plans for underwater lounges. Guests will be able to check out the creatures swimming near the ship while sipping a drink on a sofa that vibrates to mimic the movements of the sea.

What will cruise directors think of next?