Holiday & Seasonal

This Woman Saved All Her Amazon Boxes To Prank Her Husband—And He Had The Funniest Reaction

His reaction was too funny!

When you’re married, pulling off an April Fools’ Day prank on your spouse is no easy feat. That’s why this Wisconsin woman’s April 1 prank is so impressive.

After secretly stashing away Amazon Prime delivery boxes for months, Maureen Pritchard set up her prank in her front yard and waited for her husband to come home. As he pulled up, Pritchard’s spouse was confronted with the sight of at least 40 boxes stacked outside his front door.

It was a sight to behold — it looked as though Pritchard had gone on an insane Amazon shopping spree.

amazon package photo
Getty Images | Aaron P. Bernstein

She wrote on Facebook: “I’ve been planning an April Fools joke to play on Rob for MONTHS!! I got him good! I wish I would have continued to record right away when he came in the house. When he saw me recording out the window I thought he realized that it was a joke, but when he came inside he kept asking, ‘What IS all that?!?’ I had to explain that it was 6 months of saved boxes, from us, my parents and my sister!”

She filmed his arrival from a window. In the video Pritchard recorded, her husband points to the boxes as he gets out of the car, as if to say “What’s up with that?”

Later, when she explains the joke, Pritchard’s husband has an even funnier reaction. See for yourself:

Best of all, the prank wasn’t just on Pritchard’s husband. It also fooled every person who drove by her house that day, saw all of the boxes, and thought, “Whoa, someone at that house has a serious Amazon addiction.”

“You have no idea how many people slowed down or stopped in front of our house all day today!” Pritchard added in her Facebook post.

amazon boxes photo
Getty Images | Spencer Platt

You have to hand it to her — this was both a creative and highly entertaining April Fools’ Day prank! And we’re not the only ones who think so. The video of the prank has earned over 3,000 shares and 5,000 likes on Facebook.

It’s also garnered thousands of comments, with people calling the prank “priceless” and “brilliant.” Others joked about their own Amazon addictions, with one commenter joking, “My UPS driver knows to hide EVERYTHING.”

amazon box photo
Getty Images | Leon Neal

While you (probably) haven’t amassed as many Amazon boxes in your house as Pritchard did for her prank, it’s still good to know how to put them to good use. When you’re done opening your packages (or in Pritchard’s case, pranking your family members with them), there are plenty of ways to get rid of the boxes. Obviously, you can break them down and recycle them.

amazon packages photo
Getty Images | Justin Sullivan

But if you don’t want to do that or have too many, you might want to also consider using them for other purposes. For example, you can use them to ship clothes or other household items that you are either returning or getting rid of.

amazon package photo
Getty Images | Sean Gallup

The Verge also points out that Amazon has a partnership with Give Back Box. All you have to do is log onto the site, and enter your zip code and email address to generate a shipping label with a tracking number.

You can then use that shipping label to just fill your old Amazon boxes with anything you want to donate. Simply pack it, and drop it off at your local post office or UPS store.

amazon packages photo
Getty Images | Dan Kitwood

You can even opt to get a tax-deductible receipt from the site if you prefer, as long as you sign up for an account on the site. The donations will then go to the nearest local participating charities.

Speaking of Amazon boxes, you may wonder why the company opts to pack even small items into big boxes. After years of customers voicing their frustrations over this issue, the online retailer finally offered a brief explanation in 2016. As it explained, small items sometimes come in a large box because of the packing software it uses.

This software determines how many packages can fit on a truck and will put items into larger boxes, if need be, to keep them from shifting in transit. When determining which size boxes to use to keep things packed snugly in the delivery truck, the program tends to play it cautious. It chooses a box that is more than big enough for the product, which Amazon claims is better for allowing products to arrive without damage.

What do you think of this woman’s prank? Would you have fallen for it?

Additional reporting by Michelle Regalado.