Food & Recipes

You Can Now Buy Pedialyte For Adults

And it's *sparkling* !

New Year’s Eve is upon us, which means many people will be heading out to parties and indulging in a cocktail or two (or more). Before you get your celebration started, however, it’s important to be prepared — and that includes having a hangover cure at the ready.

MaSomeny people swear by Pedialyte — the oral electrolyte solution for kids that helps prevent dehydration when they’re sick — as a tried-and-true hangover elixir. For many, the drink can cure the headaches, dry mouth, queasiness and general feeling of malaise that often strikes the day after imbibing one too many alcoholic drinks.

Now, the brand is rolling out a version of its drink specifically for adults battling hangovers. It’s called Sparkling Rush, and it’s a packet of powders with electrolytes that you simply add to water and drink. It comes in cherry and grape flavors and has a seltzer-like fizz. It’s currently sold at Target, Meijer and through Amazon.

Amazon

“There’s a reason so many turn to Pedialyte when they need help hydrating — it works,” Jennifer Williams, a research scientist at Abbott Laboratories (the makers of Pedialyte), said in a press release. “Pedialyte is so effective because the levels of electrolytes and carbohydrate are optimal for rehydration, and now our Pedialyte Sparkling Rush powder offers a new, on-the-go option for those who love some bubble in their beverages.”

In addition to serving as a hangover cure, the press release indicates that Pedialyte can help to rehydrate in instances of flu and air travel, both of which are common during this time of year.

Some, like Twitter user @5k_chick, also used it during an exercise session:

Another proponent, going by the handle @sgage1, says it kept him hydrated throughout the holiday season:

But is it really going to help ward off hangover symptoms?

“Pedialyte [the ‘pedia’ means kids] was created for kids who need replenishment when [they get] ill from vomiting, diarrhea, fever, and so on,” nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix explained to NBC’s “Today.” “The attraction to Pedialyte, perhaps, is to get more sodium and potassium with less calories — but whether you really need that quantity is another story.”

Would you give Sparkling Rush a try?